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Women Who Lead Featuring School Principa

Foreword Author

Dr. Kendra March, a native of Winston-Salem NC has served In Guilford County Schools as the school support officer for Elementary Area 2 since 2017. 

March started her educational career in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (CMS), as a classroom teacher and then served as an assistant principal and principal. In CMS, she led Elizabeth Traditional, Crestdale Middle, Hopewell High followed by being asked to return as the principal of Westerly Hills Academy, a high-poverty, struggling school as part of “Strategic Staffing Initiative” which her dissertation was based upon.

Under March’s leadership, student proficiency grew more than 23 percentage points on state tests, and the school’s growth designation changed from “no recognition” to “high growth” status. The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction named Westerly Hills a “School of Excellence” due to the high-growth standards.

Dr. March has also served in central office and state-level positions in Georgia, New York, and North Carolina as a school transformation coach, assistant superintendent, and deputy superintendent. 

March has her bachelor’s, Master’s Degrees in School Leadership and K-12 Curriculum and Instruction and Supervision, and her Doctorate in Educational Leadership, all from the University of North Carolina-Charlotte.

Contributing Authors

ORDER FROM DR. SHEKA HOUSTON
Sheka Houston (1).jpg
ORDER FROM JEWEL SANDERS

Dr. Kendra March, a native of Winston-Salem NC has served In Guilford County Schools as the school support officer for Elementary Area 2 since 2017. 

March started her educational career in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (CMS), as a classroom teacher and then served as an assistant principal and principal. In CMS, she led Elizabeth Traditional, Crestdale Middle, Hopewell High followed by being asked to return as the principal of Westerly Hills Academy, a high-poverty, struggling school as part of “Strategic Staffing Initiative” which her dissertation was based upon.

Under March’s leadership, student proficiency grew more than 23 percentage points on state tests, and the school’s growth designation changed from “no recognition” to “high growth” status. The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction named Westerly Hills a “School of Excellence” due to the high-growth standards.

Dr. March has also served in central office and state-level positions in Georgia, New York, and North Carolina as a school transformation coach, assistant superintendent, and deputy superintendent. 

March has her bachelor’s, Master’s Degrees in School Leadership and K-12 Curriculum and Instruction and Supervision, and her Doctorate in Educational Leadership, all from the University of North Carolina-Charlotte.

Contributing Authors

ORDER FROM DR. JACKIE TOBIAS
Tobiasjackie - Lorna Tobias (2).JPG
ORDER FROM DR. ALICIA MAPHIES
Maphies picture - Alicia Maphies (1).JPG

"Leadership is second only to classroom instruction among all school-related factors that contribute to what students learn at school. ... Especially when we think of leaders in formal administrative roles, the greater the challenge the greater the impact of their actions on learning" (Leithwood, 2004).

Women Who Lead Featuring School Principa